Skip to main content
Back to Seminars & Conferences

Wars, Local Political Institutions, And Fiscal Capacity – Evidence From Six Centuries Of German History

Event information
Economic History Workshop
Workshop
Thursday, April 18, 2019
MB328, Asia Global Institute, 3/F., Main Building
  • 12:30 - 14:00

Background

Register
ABSTRACT

The workshop will explore the effect of warfare on the development of state capacity and representative institutions using novel data on cities and territories in the German lands between 1200 and 1750. More specifically, Luigi Pascali of Universitat Pompeu Fabra will show that cities with a higher conflict exposure establish more sophisticated tax systems, but also develop larger councils, councils that are more likely to be elected by citizens, and more likely to be independent of other local institutions. These results are consistent with the idea of a trade-off between more efficient taxation and power sharing proposed in earlier work. Luigi and his team make headway on establishing a causal role of wars by using changes to German nobles’ positions within the European nobility network to instrument for conflict.

 

First come, first served. 

Speakers
LUIGI PASCALI
LUIGI PASCALI
Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
LUIGI PASCALI
LUIGI PASCALI
Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Universitat Pompeu Fabra

Professor Pascali is also affiliated professor of the Institute of Political Economy and Governance (IPEG) and of the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics, and research affiliate of the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) and the Centre for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR). Finally, I am an Associate Editor at the Economic Journal. I am a co-organizer of the "Galatina Summer Meetings" and the workshop "Towards Sustained Economic Growth" in the "Barcelona GSE Summer Forum". He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Boston College. His research covers topics in growth and development, economic history and macroeconomics and has appeared in international journals, including the American Economic Review and the Review of Economics and Statistics. He is an associate editor at the Economic Journal.