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Dr. Tak Zhongqiang HUANG

Dr. Tak Zhongqiang HUANG

Marketing

Assistant Professor

3917 1612
takhuang@hku.hk
KK 702
Academic & Professional Qualification
  • PhD: The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • MPhil: The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Bachelor: Sun Yat-Sen University
Biography

Zhongqiang (Tak) Huang joined the University of Hong Kong in 2017. He is generally interested in the effects of the emotions and feelings that individuals happen to be experiencing at the time they make a product decision on the nature of this decision.

Research Interest
  • Emotions and feelings about different points in time (e.g., nostalgia, death anxiety)
  • Mortality salience and consumer behavior
  • Metacognitive processes in consumer behavior
  • Variety-seeking behavior
Selected Publications
  • Huang, Zhongqiang (Tak), Yitian (Sky) Liang, Charles B. Weinberg, and Gerald J. Gorn (2019), “The Sleepy Consumer and Variety Seeking,” Journal of Marketing Research, Forthcoming.
  • Huang, Zhongqiang (Tak), Xun (Irene) Huang, and Yuwei Jiang (2018), “The Impact of Death-Related Media Information on Consumer Value Orientation and Scope Sensitivity,” Journal of Marketing Research, 55 (3), 432-45.
  • Huang, Xun (Irene), Zhongqiang (Tak) Huang, and Robert S. Wyer, Jr. (2018), “The Influence of Social Crowding on Brand Attachment,” Journal of Consumer Research, 44 (5), 1069-84.
  • Huang, Xun (Irene), Zhongqiang (Tak) Huang, and Robert S. Wyer, Jr. (2016), “Slowing Down in the Good Old Days: The Effect of Nostalgia on Consumer Patience,” Journal of Consumer Research, 43 (3), 381-87.
  • Huang, Zhongqiang (Tak) and Jessica Y. Y. Kwong (2016), “Illusion of Variety: Lower Readability Enhances Perceived Variety,” International Journal of Research in Marketing, 33 (3), 674-87.
  • Huang, Zhongqiang (Tak) and Robert S. Wyer, Jr. (2015), “Diverging Effects of Mortality Salience on Variety Seeking: The Different Roles of Death Anxiety and Semantic Concept Activation,” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 58, 112-23.